They told her as a young widow that she will spend her life in either one of two tragic ways. The first is waiting for another husband who is not going to support financially a mother with three children and the second way is living as a passerby waiting for charity and people’s sympathy but she refused giving up and living as a griever.

Rasha, 36, broke rural community barriers that prevent women from entering the labor market and showed that the person’s will and determination are the most important reasons for success, stemming from the challenge of self-affirmation. She sold bread in front of her rural home and then sweets and chocolates. Rasha represented a model for how an ambitious country-woman should be for how the balance she made between the needs of her children and work.

Rasha sought expanding her project to ensure a higher return to suffice the requirements of her children and entered the field of selling sportswear. She built a good reputation with the merchants for her commitment to pay her dues on one hand, as well as buyers’ trust for the quality of her products and conveniences of goods’ settlement. As years went by and children grew up, Rasha displayed her products in a small rented shop.  Rasha worked very hard until a neighbor encouraged her to apply for a group loan from Al Tadamun Microfinance Foundation for EGP 3,000. She bought more merchandise and embarked on the path of success. Rasha says that what reconciles her tiredness at work is the confidence from those around her. Finally, Rasha stated: “I was helpless and I counted on myself; I was physically drained; nonetheless, I stood up for work. I advise any woman to seek work opportunities such as selling simple products. I wish widening my work’s scope to include bedding and linens.